The Hobbit (part 1)

I got this book from my Mum one summer holiday from a recommendation by primary school headteacher. I attempted to read it, knowing that it was loved by many, but found myself not even getting to the second chapter. I felt disappointed I just couldn’t get into it, but chose to leave, to read something that interested me more.

Maybe I was too young to appreciate the magical quality of Tolkein’s writing, as after finally reading it the whole way through, I feel ashamed I couldn’t do it at first go. I loved. I really, really did.

I’m not really into my fantasy fiction, so The Hobbit was a pretty good education into what makes fantasy such a good genre. I can literally find no other way to describe it other than magical. When reading it, you feel like a child, exploring a new world. Apart from a part that drags in the middle, it is fantastic. Its awesome. In fact I URGE you to read it.

I had many reservations when it came to the movie. First of all, turning a book of 300 pages into a trilogy was definitely a risky move, as I was worried it may be too heavy on the filler for my liking. However, my fears proved unfounded, while there was filler, it was so in keeping with the themes and magical quality of the book, it didn’t really matter. My favourite addition was the hedgehog called Sebastian, whose resurrection appealed to my love of the spiky creatures.

The Hobbit visually was made to be on the big screen. It was truly fascinating to watch this world I had imagined so vividly right in front of me; it was so beautifully shot, I wasn’t let down at all.

The length of the film was definitely an issue, as my mother who was not quite as enamored with the film as I was. She did concede, though, that she enjoyed it more than she expected to, and if it hadn’t been so repetitive, she would have loved it.

The film has seemed to convince the hard-core Hobbit and Lord of the Rings fans that this trilogy will be a good one, but as far as adaptation goes, they’re on to a winner.

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